Library

Library photo"An Independent Municipal Library Since 1957"

500 Northeast 26th Street
Wilton Manors, Florida 33305
Phone: (954) 390-2195
Fax: (954) 390-2183

Library Hours


Monday: 9:30 AM - 5:30 PM
Tuesday: 9:30 AM - 5:30 PM
Wednesday: 12:00 Noon - 8:00 PM
Thursday: 9:30 AM - 5:30 PM
Friday: 9:30 AM - 5:30 PM
Saturday: 9:30 AM - 1:00 PM

The Library is closed on Sundays and holidays. The Library is also closed on the Saturday before Memorial Day, on the Saturday before Labor Day, and as directed by the City of Wilton Manors.

In celebration of Independence Day, the Library will be closed on Tuesday, July 4th.

image of July 4 vintage postcard

You may check the City's Event Calendar for information about specific Library events and programs.

About the Library


The Richard C. Sullivan Public Library of Wilton Manors is a full-service library offering a collection of over 40,000 items including books, magazines, and local and national newspapers. The Library also provides large print books, books in Spanish, music CDs, DVDs, eBooks, and audio books. Staff are always ready to assist you in locating what you need. Internet access is also available free of charge to residents.

The children’s room offers reference materials, computers, and staff ready to assist students with their homework and research assignments. Ongoing activities include story times, craft sessions, and other programs for kids. Summers also are filled with activities and events. Many programs and services are subsidized by the Friends of the Library.

For your convenience, a copy machine and a fax machine are available for a small fee. A free book delivery service is available to residents who are unable to come to the Library. Voter registration forms are also available. Broward County residents may obtain a library card free of charge with proof of residency.

To use the Library's catalog, follow the "Search the Catalog" link on the left side of this page or click here. If we don't have what you're looking for, you may want to search the Broward County Library's catalog or the catalog of the Oakland Park Library.

Still can't find what you need? Ask us about interlibrary loan.

GLBT Book Month


No longer just a place for books, the Richard C. Sullivan Public Library is a trusted resource that transforms lives through fostering community, understanding and access to the very best in Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender (GLBT) literature.glbt-book-month-2017

June is GLBT Book Month, and the Library will carry on its commitment to diversity and join hundreds of libraries across the nation in a national celebration of authors and books that reflect the GLBT experience.

We invite you to visit the Library and join efforts to educate and celebrate our differences. 

The first and most enduring award for GLBT books is the Stonewall Book Awards, sponsored by the American Library Association's Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Round Table. Since Isabel Miller's Patience and Sarah received the first award in 1971, many other books have been honored for exceptional merit relating to the gay/lesbian/bisexual/transgender experience. Check out these award winning e-books.

Book cover

Fairyland is a beautiful, vibrant memoir about growing up motherless in 1970s and '80s San Francisco with an openly gay father. After his wife died in a car accident, bisexual writer and activist Steve Abbott moved with his two-year-old daughter to San Francisco. There they discovered a city in the midst of revolution, bustling with gay men in search of liberation — few of whom were raising a child. Reconstructing their life together from a remarkable cache of her father's journals, letters, and writings, Alysia Abbott gives us an unforgettable portrait of a tumultuous, historic time in San Francisco as well as an exquisitely moving account of a father's legacy and a daughter's love.

American Honor Killings by David McConnell is an expose of an America no one is comfortable talking about: the volatile ground where male violence and sexuality overlap.

Benjamin Alire Sáenz's stories in Everything Begins and Ends at the Kentucky Club reveal how all borders — real, imagined, sexual, human, the line between dark and light, addict and straight — entangle those who live on either side. Take, for instance, the Kentucky Club on Avenida Juárez two blocks south of the Rio Grande. It's a touchstone for each of Sáenz's stories. His characters walk by, they might go in for a drink or to score, or they might just stay there for a while and let their story be told. Sáenz knows that the Kentucky Club, like special watering holes in all cities, is the contrary to borders. It welcomes Spanish and English, Mexicans and gringos, poor and rich, gay and straight, drug addicts and drunks, laughter and sadness, and even despair. It's a place of rich history and good drinks and cold beer and a long polished mahogany bar. Some days it smells like piss. "I'm going home to the other side." That's a strange statement, but you hear it all the time at the Kentucky Club.
 
"This is Beautiful Music for Ugly Children, on community radio 90.3, KZUK. I'm Gabe. Welcome to my show." My birth name is Elizabeth, but I'm a guy. Gabe. My parents think I've gone crazy and the rest of the world is happy to agree with them, but I know I'm right. I've been a boy my whole life. When you think about it, I'm like a record. Elizabeth is my A side, the song everybody knows, and Gabe is my B side — not heard as often, but just as good. It's time to let my B side play. Beautiful Music for Ugly Children by Kirstin Cronn-Mills was the winner of the 2014 Stonewall Book Award for Children's and Young Adult Literature.

Branded by the Pink Triangle by Ken Setterington is a history of the persecution of gay men by the Nazi regime during the Holocaust. When the Nazis came to power in Europe, the lives of homosexuals came to be ruled by fear as raids, arrests, prison sentences, and expulsions became the daily reality. When the concentration camps were built, homosexuals were imprisoned along with Jews. The pink triangle, sewn onto prison uniforms, became the symbol of their persecution. This book combines historical research with first-person accounts and individual stories to bring this time to life for readers. From the first chapter, with its story of a young Jewish girl who was rescued from the depths of despair and starvation in the camps by a fellow prisoner who wore the pink triangle, to the last, entitled It Gets Better, which outlines the strides forward in gay rights made in the decades since the war, the feeling of bravery and perseverance in the face of inhuman cruelty shines through.

Book Jacket

Art on Fire is the apparent biography of subversive painter Francesca deSilva, the founding foremother of "pseudorealism," who lived hard and died young. But in the tradition of Vladimir Nabokov's acclaimed novel Pale Fire, it's a fiction from start to finish. It opens with Francesca's early life. We learn about her childhood love, the chess genius Lisa Sinsong, as well as her rivalry with her brilliant sister Isabella, who publishes an acclaimed volume of poetry at the age of twelve. She compensates for the failings of her less than attentive parents by turning to her grandmother who is loyal and adoring until she learns Francesca is a lesbian, when she rejects her. Francesca flees to a ramshackle cabin in Wellfleet, Massachusetts, working weekends at the flea market. She breaks into the gloomy basement of a house, where she begins her life as a painter. Much to her confusion and even dismay, fame comes quickly. Interspersed with Francesca's narrative are thirteen critical "essays" on the paintings of Francesca deSilva by critics, academics, and psychologists—essays that are razor-sharp satires on art, lesbian life, and the academic world, puncturing pretentiousness with every paragraph. Hilary Sloin's Art on Fire is a darkly comic, pitch-perfect, and fearless satire on the very art of biography itself.

Nate Foster has big dreams. His whole life, he's wanted to star in a Broadway show. (Heck, he'd settle for seeing a Broadway show.) But how is Nate supposed to make his dreams come true when he's stuck in Jankburg, Pennsylvania, where no one (except his best pal Libby) appreciates a good show tune? With Libby's help, Nate plans a daring overnight escape to New York. There's an open casting call for E.T.: The Musical, and Nate knows this could be the difference between small-town blues and big-time stardom. Tim Federle's debut novel, Better Nate Than Ever, is full of broken curfews, second chances, and the adventure of growing up —  because sometimes you have to get four hundred miles from your backyard to finally feel at home.

Her sister was captured in Iraq, she's the resident laughingstock at school, and her therapist tells her to count instead of eat. Can a daring new girl in her life really change anything? Angie is broken — by her can't-be-bothered mother, by her high-school tormentors, and by being the only one who thinks her varsity-athlete-turned-war-hero sister is still alive. Hiding under a mountain of junk food hasn't kept the pain (or the shouts of "crazy mad cow!") away. Having failed to kill herself — in front of a gym full of kids — she's back at high school just trying to make it through each day. That is, until the arrival of KC Romance, the kind of girl who doesn't exist in Dryfalls, Ohio. A girl who is one hundred and ninety-nine percent wow! A girl who never sees her as Fat Angie, and who knows too well that the package doesn't always match what's inside. With an offbeat sensibility, mean girls to rival a horror classic, and characters both outrageous and touching, Fat Angie, a darkly comic anti-romantic romance by E.E. Charlton-Trujillo, will appeal to anyone who likes entertaining and meaningful fiction.


















INFO HERE

Library Electronic Resources and Services


Florida Electronic Library
The Right Service at the Right Time
Ancestry Library Edition
Digital Magazines
Mango Languages


Important Information for Parents 


 drawing of girl
It is tempting to believe the Library is a haven that your child can visit without worrying about his or her safety. The fact is that the Library is a public building, open to all. Please use the same precautions for insuring your child’s safety that you would in any other public location. Young children should not be left unattended in the Library.

When children are left alone they may become frightened or anxious. If they wander through the building they may encounter hazards such as doors, furniture, or electrical equipment. They may also become bored and restless and could disturb the enjoyment and work of others.

The safety of children left alone in the Library is a serious concern of the Library staff. However, the responsibility for the safety and behavior of children in the Library rests with the parent or caregiver, and not with the Library personnel. Library employees cannot be responsible for children who are unattended or demonstrating inappropriate behavior. The following guidelines will be followed concerning the care and behavior of young Library users.

In accordance with the Library's rules, customers -- including children -- who engage in inappropriate behavior may be asked to leave the Library. If a child is not able to leave the Library on his or her own, then the child should not be in the Library without a parent or caregiver. All unaccompanied children at the Library should have the telephone number of someone who can assist them in an emergency.

By following these guidelines, you can help us continue to provide excellent and effective service while maintaining the Library's safe and welcoming atmosphere. 
 

ABCmouse.com

ABCmouse.com logo
The award-winning ABCmouse.com curriculum is designed to help young children (ages 2–7+) build a strong foundation for academic success. ABCmouse.com is 100% educational, with more than 4,000 learning activities across all major subject areas -- reading, math, science, social studies, art, and music. Best of all, kids love it. And it’s free to use in the Library! From Age of Learning, Inc. 
  

Find Your Next Favorite Book With Selectreads!

SelectReads logo
Discovering books that match your interests is easy with SelectReads.

"Book" your next adventure by using SelectReads -- our online book discovery service. Try it and find great reading ideas for everyone in your family. SelectReads gives you reading lists and recommendations based on what you like.

Ask your librarian about SelectReads.

A Word Regarding Fees and Fines


Library customers borrow over 50,000 items per year from the Richard C. Sullivan Public Library. In striving to assure that the greatest variety of materials are available for Library users, we have found that fines are an effective encouragement for prompt return of materials. We also apply certain fees that encourage appropriate use of our materials so that once returned, the items may be borrowed by others without delay.

We understand that due to a wide variety of circumstances such as illness or other unanticipated demands in our personal lives, materials are sometimes returned late. However, we do not attempt to judge any individual's circumstances as more excusable than another's. The impact of late returns is the same in all cases regardless of the cause. We do not provide exceptions based on cause.

As custodians of both the collection and the public's trust, the Library is committed to fair and consistent application of our policies. Holding all users equally accountable for the use of the Library and any fees or fines incurred is part of meeting that public obligation.

The Library works to encourage our borrowers to avoid accruing fines and fees. We provide notices to help educate and inform borrowers regarding the use of their account.
How can I avoid fines?

We provide many opportunities for you to avoid the accrual of fines on your library account. However, please remember that materials borrowed from the Richard C. Sullivan Public Library may only be returned here. Please note that materials returned to the after-hours drop will be considered returned on the next date on which the Library is open.

The Library provides 3 ways for you to renew your eligible material:

Ultimate Guide to Fake News: 27 of the Worst Fake News Sources 

TechBoomers logo

If you spent any manner of time on the Internet in 2016, you probably noticed the term “fake news” being thrown around. It seems that the events of 2016 helped fuel an epidemic of the writing, posting, and sharing of articles posing as factual news releases. In reality, they were nothing more than clickbait attempts at generating revenue through the spreading of nearly unbelievable stories that captivated the emotions of many.

It’s never fun when you read something awe-inspiring online and then find out later that you were tricked into believing something entirely untrue. It’s also embarrassing when you share the latest "breaking news" – showing your friends that you're one of the first people in the know – and then that news ends up being fake. Your reputation could take a hit, and in the future, people you connect with will tend not to believe your stories.

So how do you combat this? There are people who make their livings by posting and promoting fake news online, and they try their hardest to get you believe in what they’re writing. So how are you to possibly know if a news source is legitimate or not?

Click here to see the full story on TechBoomers
.